News and Feature Articles from the Shallow Marine Surveys Group

Expedition Blog Launched!

We are pleased to announce the launch of the SMSG blog, keeping everyone updated with day to day news of the group's activities and expedition reports.


Coinciding with SMSG's most ambitious expedition yet, the new blog has been developed in order for us to easily keep everyone updated with day to day events. 

Please visit the blog and follow the team as they prepare for the August 2012 marine biodiversity survey of Ascension Island. Swapping our usual dry-suits for more tropical attire, SMSG, in cooperation with a number of partner organisations and individuals, will be spending 3 weeks conducting an intensive survey of the marine life occurring around the small volcanic island in the middle of the Atlantic. 

Bryozoan diversity in the South Atlantic

Bryozoan (lace coral) diversity in the South Atlantic revealed.

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SMSG hosts Dr Blanca Figuerola in her study of spatial patterns of bryozoan biodiversity in the Falklands and South Georgia.

Bryozoans, colonial invertebrates, are abundant and important members of the benthic community, inhabiting from the shallow to the abyssal plains. Although they are of the conspicuous members on the benthic assemblage, bryozoans of the Falkland and South Georgia Islands remain understudied.

Supported by the Shackleton Scholarship Fund, Blanca's work saw her diving around the Falklands, plus the chance to examine material from the Falkland's shelf and samples collected by SMSG in their 2010 South Georgia expedition. 

This study will provide new data on sub-Antarctic bryozoan biodiversity, their spatial patterns and their biogeographic links with neighbouring Antarctic and Patagonian regions. 

Download Blanca's preliminary report here.  While in the Falkland's Blanca was supported by SMSG, FIG Fisheries Department, SAERI, and the University of Barcelona.   Contact Blanca for further info.

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SMSG survey of South Georgia

The SMSG team completed a successful summer expedition to South Georgia, the most comprehensive study since the 1925 Discovery Expeditions.

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